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I am opening my new store so I need a advice what to stock I have got 2.5 metre base plus 5 shelves chiller for white wines and 2 metre base plus 5 shelves for red wine. Can you please advice me what makes should I stock?

Getting your wine category right represents a fantastic opportunity for your outlet.   The Winning with Wines website has a lot of valuable information around the wine category, education, store merchandising and pricing to help grow your share of wine sales and ensure you have the right products to meet your shopper’s needs. See the ‘Growing your sales’ section of the site.

We'd suggest that firstly you split your wines by format (eg. 75cl bottle, mini bottle, and box), type (sparkling, still, low alcohol) and colour (red, white, rose), this is because by the time a consumer arrives at your fixture they will probably already have decided these 3 levels. However to assist your store we have provided insight summaries on wine origin, wine varietal trends and facing allocation suggestions.

Below is the break down of wine colour %, this can be a helpful guide of how much space you should assign to each wine colour.

Wine Colour % of Wine Convenience
Red Wine 37%
White Wine 48%
Rose Wine 14%
Other 1%

Once you have established the wine colour allocation it is important to recognise the origins of wine. Below is the % break down of wine sold by origin in the UK total market and in Convenience.

Wine Origin % of Total Market % of Convenience
Australia 20% 20%
Italy 16% 14%
USA 12% 20%
France 12% 9%
Spain 11% 8%
South Africa 10% 11%
Chile 8% 9%
New Zealand 4% 4%
Other 7% 5%



Bay size and Merchandising:

The Winning with Wine website provides planogram suggestions for the main bay types, see ‘Growing your Sales’, ‘Your Fixture’. However for you store below is a suggested break down of facings for Wine colour and origin.

As a base measure you would normally fit 13 facings per 1 metre.  Thus, based on the storage information you have provided;

  • 5 Shelves by 2.5m for White wine = 32 facings
  • 5 shelf chiller 1m = 13 facings
  • 2m x 5 shelf for Red wine = 26 facings


When calculating your space available by wine origin volume we suggest the following facings by country:

Wine Origin White 2.5m Facings Chiller Facings Red 2m Facings
Australia 28 10 26
USA 30 12 26
Italy 16 8 18
South Africa 16 6 14
Chile 10 4 12
France 14 6 12
Spain 12 4 10
New Zealand 6 2 5
Other 6 0 7
Rose 22 13 0
Total Facings 160 65 130



Based on Rose % of market and your White wine available space we suggest that the below facing allocation is given to Rose products.

  • 22 Facings of 2.5m White Wine shelf
  • 13 Facings of Chiller

Your White wine range should be the same for the chiller and shelf, shoppers will prefer the option to pick their wine choice, both chilled or at room temperature.
Each product should ideally have two facings, however smaller brands can be allocated one.

The Right Range:
Stocking best selling brands and products reassures shoppers that you understand the wine category and which wines they like to buy. Your core range should be a selection of wines from the top selling brands from the most popular countries, some suggestions are listed below.

White Core Range

  • Blossom Hill [USA]
  • Hardys Stamp [Australia]
  • Hardys VR [Australia]
  • Jacobs Creek [Australia]
  • Isla Negra [Chile]
  • Echo Falls [USA]
  • Kumala [South Africa]
  • JP Chenet [France]
  • Black Tower [Germany]
  • Gallo [USA]

White Enhanced Ranged

  • Nottage Hill [Australia]
  • Wolf Blass Red Label [Australia]
  • Turner Road [USA]
  • Barefoot [USA]

Red Core Range

  • Blossom Hill [USA]
  • Hardys Stamp [Australia]
  • Hardys VR [Australia]
  • Jacobs Creek [Australia]
  • Isla Negra [Chile]
  • Echo Falls [USA]
  • Kumala [South Africa]
  • JP Chenet [France]
  • Gallo [USA]

Red Enhanced Range

  • Nottage Hill [Australia]
  • Campo Veijo [Spain]
  • Casillero de Diablo [Chile]
  • Barefoot [USA]

Rose Core Range

  • Blossom Hill [USA]
  • Echo Falls  [USA]
  • Gallo [USA]
  • JP Chentet [France]
  • Black Tower [Germany]

Pricing is an important element in a successful wine category. There are some very helpful tips in the ‘Growing your sales’, ‘Pricing and Promotions’ section of the Winning with Wines Website. However below are some key points to be aware of;

  • Most wine purchased in the convenience store sector is priced between £5 and £7. Premium wines over £7 account for 10% of sales.
  • Wines under £4 appeal to some shoppers but as they’re only looking for the lowest price they don’t need a large selection. Less than 9% of wine sales in convenience stores are under £4.Over a third of convenience store sales are between £4 and £5. It’s a good entry level for new wine shoppers and encourages trial when wine is promoted at this price.

Thank you for your question.  If you would like further information, please review the Winning with wine website.

The following question has just been asked: We are refitting and expanding our outlet and need help to ensure that we do things right. We need help from you to merchandize our range to the optimum to gain maximum benefits.

ASKED BY: Tahir Younes
ESTABLISHMENT: Beeches Express

I’d recommend getting the foundation of your wine section right. That means making sure your range covers the best selling brands in the market and that you have the right amount of space for the different colours and countries – all of this you can look up in the market section of ‘Growing your sales’. Once you’ve done this you can build on what you’ve done by adding more interest with POS. Range and merchandising are definitely your first steps.

We'd suggest that firstly you split your wines by format (eg. 75cl bottle, mini bottle, and box), type (sparkling, still, low alcohol) and colour (red, white, rose), this is because by the time a consumer arrives at your fixture they will probably already have decided these 3 levels.

After that our suggestion would be splitting by country and price point, ensuring branded ranges are merchandised together e.g. Hardys has several sub-brands at different quality and prices so merchandising these choices next to each other helps the customer trade up and spend more as they select a wine that fits their drinking occassion.

Have a look at "Your Fixture" under "Growing your Wine Sales" (Laying Out The Fixture) and this will help you with how much space you should dedicate to each country.
Don't forget to go into "Your Customer" to enter your postcode and see what types of consumers you have in your catchment area and this will tell you their wine preferences
We hope this helps and if you want further assistance please dont hestitate to ask.

The following question has just been asked: Should certain red wines be chilled?

ASKED BY: Nadine Clarke
ESTABLISHMENT: The Snowball

Serving at room temperature (14ºC -18ºC), is generally considered the optimum way to serve and drink red wine as it enhances aroma and taste. Heavy, full bodied or savoury reds with high tannin levels do not improve in any way with a spell in the fridge!  However some delicate or fruity red wines with low tannins  can benefit from being served slightly chilled (e.g. half an hour in the fridge). New World Pinot Noir and French Beaujolais are the most commonly drunk at a lower temperatures and slight chilling can bring out a whole host of different flavours.  

In a retail environment chilled space is at a premium and should be used for White, Sparkling and Rose.

As a Spar Retailer we stock quite a few award winning own label wines, along side brand names. We have 2 metres of chilled and 1.5 metres of ambient but it is not always possible to stock the top ten brands, so we tend to buy whats on promotion to sell to our customers. What would you recommend we stock given the available space, any advice would be welcome.

ASKED BY: David Marshall
ESTABLISHMENT: Spar Hawkhurst

Hi David,


Thank you for your email , your question is a very good one and not an uncommon challenge in stores with limited space.
Often , when space is limited there is the desire to fit as many lines onto the fixture as possible to provide maximum shopper choice however this can lead to fixtures becoming too cluttered.
The impact of this is that many shoppers become overwhelmed, confused and even annoyed.

Here are some solutions you may find beneficial...

1. Open up facings of lines to improve visibility of the choice on offer , even if this does mean losing a few SKU's from the range.
We would reccomend 2 facings min for slower selling lines and 3 for the leading brands.

2. Its good to hear that some of your Own Label wines are winning awards and these provide a motivation to purchase for certain shoppers. Sometimes these awards are not seen by shoppers if the fixture is too busy so it is worth highlighting them with additional POS if possible. Also, taking them off shelf onto a wine tower will give them more visibility, or even creating a defined space on the fixtire that calls out the range of award winning wines you have on sale.

3. Promotions are critical and availability/visibility off - fixture is key.  Promotions on well known brands will often out perform lesser or unknown brand by 5 or 6 times.
Having wine chilled is a key benefit to the shopper and therefore you do not neccessarily have to go as deep or aggrssive for promotions within the chiller

4. If it is difficult to fit the Top 10 brands on the fixture it is possible to have fewer but the key here is to have strong representation across Countries, Price Tiers and Varietals.
The range also needs to reflect what people are buying for example...
 
Australia is the most popular Country making up one fifth of all wine sales so broad representation of brands here is very important. [e.g. Hardys, Jacobs Creek]
For other countries the presence of a single brand will ensure that the sales opportunity is covered off [e.g. Kumala in South Africa, Campo Veijo in Spain]  
Rose Wine sales are dominated by wines from USA (almost half of all sales) therefore breadth of branded offer here is crucial. [e.g. Blossom Hill, Echo Falls]

Recommended Must Stock Brands

White Core Range
  1. Blossom Hill [USA]
  2. Hardys Stamp [Australia]
  3. Jacobs Creek [Australia]
  4. Isla Negra [Chile]
  5. Echo Falls [USA]
  6. Kumala [South Africa]
  7. JP Chenet [France]
  8. Black Tower [Germany]
  9. Gallo [USA]
White Premium brand options
  1. Nottage Hill [Australia]
  2. Wolf Blass Red [Australia]
  3. Turner Road [USA]
  4. Barefoot [USA]
Red Core Range
  1. Blossom Hill [USA]
  2. Hardys Stamp [Australia]
  3. Jacobs Creek [Australia]
  4. Isla Negra [Chile]
  5. Echo Falls [USA]
  6. Kumala [South Africa]
  7. JP Chenet [France]
  8. Gallo [USA]
Red Premium brand options
  1. Nottage Hill [Australia]
  2. Campo Veijo [Spain]
  3. Casillero de Diablo [Chile]
  4. Barefoot [USA]
Rose Core Range
  1. Blossom Hill [USA]
  2. Echo Falls  [USA]
  3. Gallo [USA]
  4. JP Chentet [France]
  5. Black Tower [Germany]

Hope this helps and I wish you a successful summer.

Does it make sense to have different products to the big stores like Tesco and Asda?

If you have the space to introduce wines that are different to the stores around you that is no bad thing. Having variety makes your range interesting and engaging.

You must however offer the wines that your shoppers want and the best selling brands are stocked in the larger retailers because they sell well.

The top ten brands are proven to provide value and they show your credentials as a wine store.

What types of promotions will my customers prefer to see in my store?

We know that shoppers tend to buy single bottles in convenience stores therefore your promotional mix should be more about price reduction than multibuys.
  • Use simple to understand offers such as Half Price, Save £1, Save £2, Save £3 etc clearly highlighting the amount saved and the new price.
  • Avoid promotions that involve customers working out the amount saved for themselves such as Save 25%, Save 33%, Save 1/3rd etc...

I don't have a fridge for wine in my convenience store. Should I have more red wines available than white wine and rosé wine?

Though we know that most of the wine bought in a convenience store is consumed the same day it is bought, we also know that as much as 83% of wine purchased from convenience stores is purchased in advance of the actual occasion it was meant for.

This means that shoppers should still have time to chill the wine before it is consumed. Therefore we wouldn't recommend stocking less white or rosé wine for that reason.

To find out what range would best suit your store please look at our Growing your sales page which will give you some ideas on range.

I want to put more wine in my fridge but it’s only small and space is tight. I know I need more rosé in there but how do I pick what to take out?

You haven'’t mentioned what else is in your fridge so we're guessing there’'s a mix of lager, cider, alcopops and wine. At the moment around 35% of beers, wines and spirit sales come from wine, so if you have five shelves available two of those should be given to wine.

Only white wine and rosé need to be chilled and if you don'’t have any rosé in there now, you would benefit from putting some in as rosé is very popular especially in convenience stores. Based on sales in the market you should have one bottle of rosé for every three or four bottles of white.

As shoppers are willing to pay a little extra for the convenience of having the wine already chilled, you should consider putting slightly more premium wines in your fridge.

I want to run some wine promotions to entice people in to my store and to encourage them to see what I have. What would you recommend are the best options?

Promotions are an excellent way of encouraging people to buy wine in your store that they would have bought elsewhere. However, people buy for different reasons or ‘occasions’ so it is important to offer a range of differently priced promotions.

If you want to increase volume then multibuys are a better option over single bottle price reductions. It sounds as though you want customers to give your wine fixture a go so if you want to give your customers a reason to try something, then a price reduction reduces the 'risk' for them.

What’s the one thing I can do to get more sales from my wine section?

If you only have time to do one thing, we'd recommend getting the foundation of your wine section right.

That means making sure your range covers the best selling brands in the market and that you have the right amount of space for the different colours or origins –- all of this you can look up in the market section of ‘Growing your sales’.

Once you’'ve done this you can build on what you'’ve done by adding more interest with POS. Range and merchandising are definitely your first steps (though that looks like two things!).

People often come in to my store and ask what wines go with the food they are having that night. How can I help them decide?

Certainly adding point of sale information, for example, 'Great with Fish', can be a useful way of getting people to engage with the wine fixture. This can be taken from the tasting notes on the wine label.

Alternatively, visit the ‘Food matching’ section under ‘About wine’ for recommendations on which wines compliment certain foods and flavours.

I do not have a huge amount of space for wine in store but I find it looks very dull and 'samey'. Is there anything I can do to jazz it up?

A great way of making your key brands visible is by using point of sale (POS). Anything to identify country of origin, taste, brands on offer etc... will increase a shopper’'s engagement and likely lead to a sale.

Also, you could organise and highlight wines depending on the season, for example whites and rosé during the summer and reds over Christmas.

Additionally, if you are short of shelf space in store but have floor space elsewhere, dual location outside of the wine aisle can increase impulse purchases (if you're in Scotland, be aware of legislation changes that mean you are no longer able to do this from October 1st 2011). You can also make additional floor space into its own standout siting, for example 'Try Australian wines'. 

Have you seen the Attracting your customers section of the website for more ideas of what you can do with POS?

What is the best way to arrange wines, in brands, e.g. gallo, echo etc or in variety, e.g. pinot, chardonnay etc?

We'd suggest that firstly you split your wines by format (eg. 75cl bottle, mini bottle, and box), type (sparkling, still, low alcohol) and colour (red, white, rose), this is because by the time a consumer arrives at your fixture they will probably already have decided these 3 levels.

After that our normal suggestion would be splitting by country and price band. Within this split you would probably end up with brands next to each other.

Have a look at the rest of the Growing your sales section of the website which provides further information. And don't forget to go into Your customer to enter your postcode and see what types of consumers you have in your catchment area.

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